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From The Socialist newspaper, 23 April 2014

The Broad Left Organising Committee

Organising militant workers

Bill Mullins

Thirty years ago a national conference took place in Sheffield organised by the Broad Left Organising Committee (Bloc).

Thousands attended, with 500 turned away due to lack of space. The meeting coincided with the start of the miners' strike in March 1984.

The miners' strike was a culmination of the rising tide of anger against the Margaret Thatcher government and its attacks on the trade union movement.

Thatcher, the Tory prime minister, was preparing to close down the mining industry, mainly to break the most powerful trade union at the time, the NUM.

Launch of Bloc

Bloc was a formation of trade union broad lefts which had been set up earlier in response to developments in the Labour Party and the use of the trade union block vote in an undemocratic way by the right-wing trade union leaders.

At that time many of the broad lefts were led or influenced by supporters of the Militant (the forerunner of the Socialist Party).

Militant argued that, because of the growing list of attacks on the working class and the miserable leadership given by many of the trade union leaders, the time was right to re-launch Bloc as a new initiative.

The aim was to try to give a lead from below to all those ready to struggle against the Tory onslaught.

It was clear that the original aims of Bloc would need to be developed. Bloc had developed a certain authority among many trade union activists.

It needed to develop this rank-and-file organisation and at the same time continue to put pressure on the official trade union bodies to prepare their members for the coming struggle.

Bloc played an important role in mobilising workers behind the miners throughout their strike, including organising pickets of the power stations and a 2,000-strong lobby of the TUC conference in September 1984 to demand a 24-hour general strike to back the miners.

Importance of strategy

Bloc held tremendously important conferences and campaigns throughout the 1980s on many issues, including important international workers' struggles.

This included a London conference in October 1986 against the privatisation of Thames Water. Regional Bloc organisations were developed.

In April 1986 the second national Bloc conference again took place in Sheffield. The miners' strike had finished in March 1985.

The defeat of the miners affected the mood of the whole working class. Nevertheless 1,800 trade union delegates were at the conference to debate the key issues of the day.

The conference was called in conjunction with the socialist-led Liverpool district Labour Party and its theme was "how to map out a strategy to defeat the witch-hunt [in the Labour Party] and build the left".

In 1983 the Labour Party's national leaders had expelled the five members of the Militant newspaper editorial board and in November 1985 they suspended Liverpool district Labour Party, in their drive to suppress socialist ideas.

Derek Hatton and Tony Mulhearn, Liverpool councillors who had been sacked from office by the Tory government in 1985 along with 47 others, addressed the conference.

The Bloc conference also highlighted the battle by the South African working class against apartheid and discussed how the trade unions in Britain should aid that struggle.

The president of the South African TGWU, Jeremiah Zulu, got a standing ovation when he called for direct links between the rank and file of the trade unions in Britain and South Africa.

A special conference was held in July 1986 in Birmingham, attended by over 350 delegates. This had the theme of fighting the privatisation of the public sector which had been unleashed by the Thatcher government.

At the time Dave Nellist was the Labour MP for Coventry South East. He opened the conference by calling for the renationalisation of all privatised services and industry with one third of the management boards made up of elected representatives of workers in the industry, one third from the TUC and one third from a Labour government.

Compensation would only be paid based on proven need. The conference called for Bloc to create a health service broad left to fight NHS privatisation.

One-day general strike?

Bloc organised another conference in February 1988 which over 1,200 delegates attended, including many from the health service.

When it was planned in September 1987 nobody foresaw the explosion of strikes, ranging from the health service to Ford in Basildon and many others that would take place leading up to the conference.

On one night shift in Manchester 38 nurses had taken strike action in frustration at understaffing, working conditions and low pay.

They then left the RCN and joined Cohse, which later became part of Unison. The strike hit the headlines and forced the government into a u-turn which was massively reported on the TV and media generally. This changed the whole mood of the trade union movement.

The conference called for the TUC to organise a one-day general strike in support of the NHS and the TUC was forced - by the mood of workers - to organise a national day of action on this issue, which included strike action at local level.

Bloc's role was crucial in showing what could be done if the trade union movement got together and acted in unison.

Unfortunately, despite Bloc's growing influence, the right wing dominance at the top of the unions effectively blocked the path to more militant action.

The right wing's policies were based on acceptance of the market and capitalism. The argument was that this required a "new realism" - in other words, unlike the 1970s when militancy was the norm, which the right wing argued led to the Thatcher government.

It was clear that by the end of the 1980s the role that Bloc could play in that period was drawing to a close.

The collapse of the Berlin Wall and capitalist ideological offensive led to a fall in political consciousness of many trade union activists.

It required new events and a new, younger layer of activists to be brought into the struggle before the human forces for any new similar organisation would be available.

The National Shop Stewards Network (NSSN) today, in a very different political climate following the world economic crisis, has that chance.

Indeed it is beginning to draw around it a new layer of trade union and community activists. It can fight to give an organisational form to the tremendous anger among working people against the government's policies.

Bloc's programme sought to unite all the struggles that workers were involved in. It called for:

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In The Socialist 23 April 2014:


Socialist Party news and analysis

Hungry Britain: Fight for jobs and a living wage for all

New figures reveal capitalism in crisis - not recovery

Scotland: Capitalist 'Project Fear' backfiring?

Why is there a housing crisis?

Zero-hour contracts damage your health

Them & Us


International socialist news and analysis

Building Socialist Alternative in the United States

China: labour disputes soar


Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition

Over 550 TUSC no-cuts candidates in place


Socialist Party workplace news

Every job matters: Support the Tube workers' strike

Care UK workers stepping up the action

Don't let Gove wreck education!

Rail workers prepare for action

CWU conference: Renationalise Royal Mail!

Workplace news in brief


Readers' comments

In the fight to defend our NHS, know your enemy

The Broad Left Organising Committee

Workers' Memorial Day: strike for safety

25 years after Hillsborough


 

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