The Socialist

The Socialist 25 October 2007

Public health not private wealth

Public health not private wealth

Join the 3 November NHS demonstration

NHS: What the Socialist Party says

March to save the NHS

Michael Moore's latest film 'Sicko' reviewed

Huddersfield SOS: Class fighters' bold initiative


Reject Royal Mail deal: Vote 'No' and reinstate the action

Striking Liverpool postal workers return to work


Why workers need a new party

Respect in crisis - what lessons for socialists?


Socialism 2007


Pakistan: Suicide bombings at Bhutto rally


Turkey's invasion threat increases regional instability

Release Saburi Akande Akinola, Taiwo Hassan Soweto and Olatunde Dairo now

France: Biggest public transport strike action since 1995


Do women still have the 'right to choose'?


Liberal Democrat leadership: Two candidates, one background, no answers

Classroom assistants challenge the Stormont Assembly

Who's to blame for teenage obesity?


Glasgow: On strike for a fair deal

Train drivers prepare for action

Fight Cadbury's factory closure

Teachers' union election time to change!

BBC threatens hundreds of jobs

 
 

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Trade Union Rights and Freedoms Bill

Why workers need a new party

THE DAY before John McDonnell MP's "watered-down" trade union freedom bill got its reading in Parliament, hundreds of trade unionists from across Britain came to lobby their MPs.

Andrew Walton, Unison shop steward, personal capacity

Trade unions are hobbled by Tory anti-union laws brought in to smash the miners and others in the 1980s. Britain is second only in Europe to Turkey in repressive trade union legislation. If these laws were repealed, unions would be able to take secondary action, such as striking against privatisation (at present illegal).

They would be able legally to take solidarity action, as in the Gate Gourmet dispute where BA baggage handlers walked out in support of sacked catering workers. Petty obstacles such as having to give complicated details of everyone who would be on strike, which resulted in the CWU union's proposed action last week being blocked by the court, would be removed.

Despite the trade unions giving millions of pounds to New Labour, the bill was left to a private member's bill. At the lobby John McDonnell himself dampened expectations, saying it would probably be 'filibustered out' of time by the government.

At the meeting of rank and file trade unionists, leaders like PCS general secretary Mark Serwotka, RMT rail union boss Bob Crow and Brian Caton (General Secretary, Prison Officers Association) spoke of the need for the bill.

Brian Caton spoke of his members' action over a three-year pay freeze and overcrowding in prisons. Society would have to pick up the pieces if people with mental health problems, who needed NHS help not imprisonment, continued to be locked up without adequate resources to treat them. The idea that prison officers could be threatened with imprisonment for going on strike was greeted with derision where were they going to be put?

Tony Woodley (General Secretary, Unite) was greeted with jeers of "stop giving them money" when he argued that unions should keep affiliating to New Labour as our only hope, due to its links with the trade union movement. Yet Labour has carried out numerous attacks on public services and has no intention of making life easier for unions to campaign against them.

This Freedoms Bill could not even be debated in parliament. Similarly John McDonnell could not get on the ballot paper during Gordon Brown's leadership "coronation." These testify to the hopelessness of trying to turn New Labour around.

A century ago, rail workers came together with other trade unionists to form the Labour Party, due to the lack of political representation in parliament. This meeting made me even more convinced of the need for a new voice today to represent working-class people.

Such a party could help enable trade unionists to fight on a level playing field with their employers and provide a platform within which the need for a socialist transformation of society could be argued out.

The best way to get the Tory Party's anti-trade union laws repealed is for more unions to get behind the national shop stewards' movement and support the campaign for a new workers' party at www.cnwp.org.uk.


In this issue

Public health not private wealth

Join the 3 November NHS demonstration

NHS: What the Socialist Party says

March to save the NHS

Michael Moore's latest film 'Sicko' reviewed

Huddersfield SOS: Class fighters' bold initiative


Postal dispute

Reject Royal Mail deal: Vote 'No' and reinstate the action

Striking Liverpool postal workers return to work


Campaign for a New Workers Party

Why workers need a new party

Respect in crisis - what lessons for socialists?


Socialism 2007

Socialism 2007


Socialist Party feature

Pakistan: Suicide bombings at Bhutto rally


International socialist news and analysis

Turkey's invasion threat increases regional instability

Release Saburi Akande Akinola, Taiwo Hassan Soweto and Olatunde Dairo now

France: Biggest public transport strike action since 1995


Socialist Party women

Do women still have the 'right to choose'?


Socialist Party news and analysis

Liberal Democrat leadership: Two candidates, one background, no answers

Classroom assistants challenge the Stormont Assembly

Who's to blame for teenage obesity?


Workplace news and analysis

Glasgow: On strike for a fair deal

Train drivers prepare for action

Fight Cadbury's factory closure

Teachers' union election time to change!

BBC threatens hundreds of jobs


 

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